Seven

When the iPhone X and 8 were released in 2017 I had to get a new phone. My 6S had been on the verge of breaking due to battery issues - I didn’t trust it anymore. But, instead of getting the latest iPhone, I got myself a 7.

I could buy an iPhone 7 with a whopping 128GB of storage for less than what Apple tries to sell the iPhone 8 for.

Even now that the iPhone XR and XS have been released I have no desire to upgrade. Yes, the XR and XS look great, and the XR even seems like another great deal. But I tend to carry a phone for longer than ever before (excluding my 6S which had a manufacturing defect) making it an even better deal. Yet I stick with my 7 for the foreseeable future.

The new iPhones offer no compelling features to me: I take pictures with my Sony RX100M4 so the camera isn’t important, iOS 12 is plenty fast and storage is not going to be a problem. I believe the smartphone world is struggling to come up with compelling new features to lure customers into buying their latest offering.

Of course people holding on to their phones for longer is a problem for Apple. They try fixing their problem by increasing the prices each time, further decreasing the likelihood I’ll buy the latest iPhone. You can already see the effects of this in Apple’s stock price - people refuse to pay the absurd prices and decide to stick with their current iPhone or even switch to Android.

In the longterm this is not going to be a sustainable business model for them. Apple needs to come up with a new Money Making Machine. Apple seems to be aware they need to become a platform company by offering iTunes on Samsung tv’s and AirPlay 2 on others. These are all great steps in the right direction.

But will it make iPhones more affordable again?